Category Archives: Casual Dining

Seoul Food Safari: Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Japan

New year’s resolution: revive food blog.

I published 14 posts in 2015, a little bit more than one per month, which is actually not that bad but I think I can do a lot better. I blame the strange and uncharacteristic fitness kick that took over my life in the summer… spent all my spare time run-walking and didn’t eat out that much. I don’t know what came over me. But thankfully, I have now entered winter hibernation which means a lot less moving and a lot more eating.

The smart thing to do would be to trash everything in my backlog and just start from my most recently eaten meal… but the very very small OCD part of me can’t bear to just let all these photos and experiences disappear into oblivion. So I’m gonna do a few quick photo-dump bulk-blogging posts to clear my library and actually get things up-to-date here. Because these places are still worth posting about, provided that they still exist.

I noticed that most of my backlog consisted of international food spots, so I’ve dubbed this series “Seoul Food Safari” and today our tastebuds travel to Uzbekistan, Vietnam, and Japan. Click on the name of each restaurant for address and Naver map!

1. Samarkand Restaurant, Ansan (technically not Seoul but . . . eh.)

IMG_9762

On our second visit to Ansan, we had dinner at Samarkand which is an Uzbek restaurant that comes highly recommended by everyone on the internet who has written anything about good food in the Ansan area.

The waiter greeted us at the door and didn’t seem to want to let us sit inside. “Inside? Smoking only outside.” Because we clearly look like pack-a-day kind of people. I blame Matt’s long hair and facial scar (actually from chicken pox).

IMG_9764

It’s a small cafe-style restaurant, with an Uzbek mini-mart in the back. Walls decked with traditional Uzbek clothing (still in their plastic cover? maybe it’s just the owner’s drycleaning…)

I always get really confused about how to order at these kinds of restaurants. It feels most natural to speak in English because obviously I can’t speak Uzbekistani but it feels so weird to speak Korean (my second language) to another non-Korean person. But EVERY SINGLE TIME my English gets blank looks and I end up just awkwardly pointing at menu items. And then I overhear the waiter speaking fluent Korean to another table and feel like an idiot.

IMG_9765

Prices have gone up in recent years, but they’re still pretty reasonable. We ordered the Plov on the recommendation of an Uzbek friend who always talks about how much he misses it.

IMG_9770

Plov (also known as pilaf in other cultures) is a very simple dish of seasoned rice, carrots and lamb. The rice is incredibly flavourful because it’s actually cooked on top of the lamb and carrots in a dutch oven, infusing it with all the stock and spices.

The servingware here is beautiful too.

IMG_9772

We also got Samsa which is huge triangle-shaped pastry packed with a meat and onion filling.

IMG_9776

I LOVE meat-filled pastries, but they sadly do not form part of Korean cuisine (the closest thing would probably be fried dumplings). But these really hit the spot after being long-deprived of my Aussie meat pies and sausage rolls. I really liked the mix of spices that were present in each dish – relatively mild compared to Asian or Middle-Eastern cooking, but still gave every mouthful a very distinct and interesting flavour.

IMG_9777

We ended our meal with some barbecued lamb skewers which were charred and juicy and amazing. Lamb is the rarest of the meats here (most Koreans hate the smell) so its always a special treat and whenever I eat it I always exclaim something like “LAMB! I almost forgot how delicious you were!”

I knew absolutely zero about Uzbek food before this meal but I really enjoyed it. It was somewhat similar to the Middle-Eastern food that I know and love, but was also a new experience in itself. If you’re not keen enough to travel to Ansan, the goods news is that there’s a Samarkand Cafe in Dongdaemun that is also pretty well known (very close to Dongdaemun History and Culture Park station). I’m not sure if it has the same owner, but from the photos I’ve seen the food looks almost identical. Totally worth a visit if you’re sick of Korean food and want to try something completely different.

2. Lie Lie Lie, Yeonnam-Dong 

IMG_9797

In my quest to find the best Vietnamese pork roll in Seoul, Lie Lie Lie is the current frontrunner. It’s a tiny shop hidden in the alleyways of up-and-coming “hot place” Yeonnam-dong – an area next to Hongdae that is brimming with cool little shops, cafes, and eateries.

This place is great for a number of reasons. Firstly, all the bread is freshly baked daily on premises.

img_98021

Here is the oven to prove it.

IMG_9798

This is the closest thing I’ve found to the Vietnamese rolls from the “hot bread” bakeries in Sydney. While I do love banh mi served in a classic french baguette, this is the kind of bread that defines “pork roll” for me.

img_98041

Second, they stock cans and cans of the essential ingredient: LIVER SPREAD. Pork roll is not pork roll without the dodgy pâté, but this is the first banh mi place I’ve found in Seoul that actually has it. Pâté has a flavour and texture that Koreans wouldn’t typically enjoy, so I understand why places don’t bother with it but without the spread, whatever you’re selling isn’t banh mi; it’s a banh mi-inspired sandwich.

img_98031

They have four different types at the very good price of 5,500 won and of course I happily paid the 500 won extra for the chicken liver pate. I was only really interested in the cold cut version, but I was with a friend who had never tried banh mi before so we ordered three different ones for the sake of variety.

IMG_9808

IMG_9809

The grilled chicken and spicy pork banh mi were both really good (the spicy pork one tasted a bit like Korean-Vietnamese fusion) and all the essential vegetable components were present:

IMG_9814

Cucumber, carrot, pickled radish, fresh chopped chilli, spring onion, and coriander. They could be a bit more generous with the fillings, but hey, at least everything was there and nothing weird was added (I’ve had some banh mi here with iceberg lettuce. That’s no-no.)

IMG_9837

The best BY FAR was the cold cut w/ pâté. The only thing missing was the maggi sauce, so it wasn’t quite the lovely, messy, sauce-soaked experience of a Sydney pork roll but it was more than good enough to satisfy my cravings.

A word of warning: the rolls are quite small. One roll per person is not enough for lunch – we were quite happy with three rolls between the two of us but I could easily polish off two myself if hungry enough.

There are a couple of other banh mi joints on my radar, and if any other place manages to beat Lie Lie Lie on flavour and authenticity, it will for sure make an appearance on this blog, don’t worry.

3. Fukuoka Hamburg, Hongdae

I have learned to embrace the hamburg “steak” – the minced beef steak substitute enjoyed in cattle-poor nations, otherwise known as a “patty” or “rissole” in places where red meat is more of a staple than a luxury. It is sad excuse for steak, but it does the job when my belly craves beef but my wallet can’t afford it.

I first had hot-stone self-cook hamburg in Tokyo and I loved it. Every bite of fatty hamburg is perfectly cooked to your liking, still sizzling from the magic stone. It’s also just a fun eating experience, and having individual cooking stones feels much more refined than grilling meat in a barbecue grill built into your table.

I found this place after watching two characters go on a date here in a Korean drama. The drama sucked, but at least it led me to Fukuoka Hamburg – a trendy chain restaurant that has a few locations around Seoul These photos are from about six months ago but I actually went back the other day and it was just as good as I remembered.

IMG_9854

This is the “egg garlic” hamburg that comes on a bed of scrambled egg and garlic chips. You can also just get egg hamburg, egg cheese hamburg, or the PREMIUM egg cheese AND garlic hamburg. You can get the hamburg steak without the egg too, but why would you?

The steak comes in XS, S, M and L sizes and even as a pretty big eater, S was enough hamburg for me (even without any rice!) The self-cooking forces you to eat quite slowly, so I was quite satisfied by the end of it.

IMG_9845

You not only get your own personal cooking stone, each person also gets their own smoke ventilation pipe. And if your hot stone starts to cool down, they give just replace it with a new one.

Safety tips: DO NOT TOUCH THE HOT STONE. Not even when its cooled down. And wear the disposable aprons they give you if you want to protect your clothes from sputtering beef fat.

It’s on the pricey side for casual dining in Seoul (starts at around 10,000 won for S size) but it’s 100% hanwoo from cattle bred and raised in Korea – so the quality of the meat and the self-cooking makes it taste so much better than your everyday hamburg. And none of that gross ketchup/Worcestershire sauce nonsense that hamburg steaks usually come swimming in.

The first time I had Fukuoka Hamburg, I ended up at a Japanese dessert cafe by complete coincidence. We were just wandering around looking for something sweet and came upon Be Sweet On, a really adorable cafe that does house-made Japanese style desserts.

Seoul is generally very good at desserts, but most cafes just have a variety of pre-made cakes and/or bingsoo. This place is unique because it serves these beautifully made-to-order desserts that look like what you’d get as the final course at a fancy restaurant.

IMG_9849

This is the Mont Blanc -puréed chestnuts with a quenelle of dark chocolate ice cream.

IMG_9855

And this is the tarte tartin – puff pastry with vanilla cream, caramelized apples, vanilla ice cream, and a thin apple chip on top.

This place ain’t cheap but they’re the prettiest desserts I’ve had in Seoul.

So that’s it for this instalment of Seoul Food Safari. In the next episode, we take our bellies to China, Britain, and Hong Kong. See you then!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Guilty Pleasures @ Guilty Pleasure, Itaewon

I have a new algorithm that helps me determine whether or not something I eat is blogworthy, or will simply be shared as a square, filtered photo and a punchy caption on my Instagram. It’s impossible to explain, not because it’s arbitrary, but because it’s, like, super complex. It inputs factors like photogenicity of dishes, number of dishes deemed photogenic (need at least 3 for blog), how much I enjoy the food, how unique the food is, whether there is a deeper story and wider narrative to the meal that goes beyond just me shoveling delicious food into my mouth because I’m hungry, whether something funny or otherwise noteworthy happened during the meal, whether the meal leaves such a lasting impression that I’m still happy to blog about it three months after the event, and so on.

All that to say, any place that makes it onto my blog should feel totally honoured. Also, FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM! You will get all (well, most) of my food and none of my babble (maybe just a little bit).

The lucky star of today’s blog is a place I found out about from a Facebook post on the “Top 5 Mac and Cheese in Seoul.” Before Korea, mac and cheese was something that came out of a Kraft box and was only eaten by poor uni students when they ran out of Mee Goreng. But now that I’m practically an honorary American (sorry, that’s what expat life does to ya!) I’m totally into stuff like mac and cheese. A restaurant in Itaewon called “Guilty Pleasure” (love the name, too) had, by far, the sexiest mac and cheese on the list so it raced up to the no. 1 spot on my TBE List (To Be Eaten List – I just made that up, let’s turn it into a thing.)

IMG_9111

If you didn’t know this was a restaurant, the bright blue neon signage that greets you at the door could easily confuse you into thinking that the pleasures being offered here were quite a bit guiltier than moreish Southern America cuisine. But it’s just the design concept guys. The only sin being committed here is gluttony… and maybe covetousness as you look over at your neighbour’s table.

IMG_9094

We sat outside on the little terrace which has a VERY different vibe to the dark, moody bar inside the restaurant. The place has a great concept – “The Food You Crave,” and by “You” they mean North Americans because the menu includes all the things that my American/Canadian friends can’t shut up about – mac and cheese, biscuits, southern fried chicken, poutine, etc. The Australian version of this place would have hot chips and gravy, meat pies, sausage rolls, fish & chips, smashed avocado on toast, cheesymite scrolls… omg should I open this restaurant?! If anyone has a few hundred thousand dollars lying around and is looking for a fun but risky investment, let me know!

IMG_9093

The napkin’s are printed with this AWESOME quote from Bruno the dog and made me smile that special smile you smile when you go to a restaurant and realise that they share your fatty boombah food philosophy. I wanted to give the owner/chef a high five.

mac

The mac and cheese comes out in a souffle dish looking swag like a cheese brulee. It costs 10,000 won which is A LOT for a side dish, but it is a rather deluxe version of the American classic. Cauliflower and cheese base, bacon lardons, pulled pork and truffle oil. It’s basically impossible for the combination of all those things to not be crazy delicious.

IMG_9101

And crazy delicious it certainly was. The “truffle oil” wasn’t just a menu trick to justify the price tag, the flavour was really strong and there was plenty of bacon and pulled pork in there to keep things interesting. The cheese sauce was thick and tasty, like it was mostly melted cheddar with just enough milk to give it a creamy texture. The best mac and cheese I’ve ever had in my limited experience – substantial, too! Better shared between a party of three or more people… but even just me and my fellow hungry girl friend managed to clean it up pretty good.

IMG_9100

We also got the Cuban Sandwich (15,000 won), which is THE sandwich of the hour thanks to the movie Chef. Korea is going through a cooking show / celebrity chef CRAZE right now so the movie was really popular here and Cubanos are popping up everywhere. And honestly, as a far as sandwiches are concerned, the Cuban is worth going a but nuts over. Two types of pork (ham and roasted), a layer of pickles, Swiss cheese, and mustard between crusty bread that’s buttered and toasted. I had my first one at a sandwich place in Itaewon (Rye Post) and felt confused about why this amazing thing had taken so long to become a worldwide phenomenon. Seriously, why have we been eating chicken salad sandwiches, and ham and cheese sandwiches, and roast beef sandwiches when we could have been eating Cubanos?

IMG_9105

The Cuban here is not really by the book, and while Fidel may disapprove of the liberties taken with this particular version, I give it two greasy thumbs up. It comprises homemade duck prosciutto (didn’t know such a thing existed, but I’m thankful that it does), pork loin confit, Swiss cheese, pickle, Dijon mustard aioli, on a pressed Italian roll. The cuisines of five different nations went into making this sandwich, and they should all be proud. The buttery bread and the salty-fatty meat should really be too much to stomach but the mustard and pickle do a really great job balancing things out, and before you know it all you’re left with is crumbs.

We probably could have stopped there, but you can’t eat conservatively at a place called “Guilty Pleasure.” We were here to indulge our tastebuds and fatten our bellies without shame.

IMG_9106

It was a really tough choice between the duck poutine (french fries topped with duck confit, served with brown duck gravy and paremesan cheese) and the buttermilk fried chicken but there is something about the words “buttermilk fried chicken” that is irresistible. This is 3/4 baby chicken with house special spice served with house buttermilk biscuits and country sausage gravy (17,000 won).

Buttermilk fried chicken usually refers to chicken that is brined in buttermilk and spices, but since the menu description only mentions buttermilk in relation to the biscuits, now I’m questioning whether there was any buttermilk involved in cooking the chicken at all. But that’s actually besides the point, because regardless of how they prepared it, the chicken was freaking good. The batter was dark gold, crispy, and light and was perfectly seasoned with Southern spices.

Honestly, I’m kind of sick of Korean Fried Chicken – it’s relies so much on sauce and marinade and the plain fried chicken (which I like best) tends to be under-seasoned so that all you can taste is frying oil. I actually miss the 11 secret herbs and spices of good ol’ KFC.

As for the biscuits and gravy… they got no love from us. We left them almost completely untouched. I’m really struggling to get on board the American style biscuits and gravy train. It’s still weird for me to see buttery scones and a chunky white sauce when, to my Aussie brain, the name suggests sweet cookies and glossy brown beef gravy. I also can’t handle eating a buttery scone-like “biscuit” with a savoury meal – it’s too weird! And let’s be honest guys, sausage gravy looks like vomit. I know ya’ll love the stuff, but come on, you can’t deny the resemblance. It’s a thick white sauce with big chunks of ground meat in it. Fair enough if you’ve grown up eating it but for me… no thank you. Not yet anyway. My Americanizzzzzation has not reached that level.

IMG_9110

Guilty Pleasure was one of the most satisfying non-Korean food experiences I’ve had in Seoul. The menu takes American home-cooked classics that could easily be mediocre and turns them into something a little more cosmopolitan, without sacrificing any of the high-fat, high-carb, high-flavour charm that makes this kind of food so comforting. So whether you’re a fatty, or a foodie, or a foodie-fatty like myself, there’s plenty to be enjoyed at Guilty Pleasure. Just remember to leave your conscience at the door.

Guilty Pleasure
1F, 2-10 Itaewon-ro 20-gil,
Yongsan-gu
Seoul, Korea

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Texas Trip of a Lifetime Q4: BBQ for Breakfast

With our utter failure to find an open barbecue truck on Monday and only one morning left to spend in Austin, the idea of having to leave without even trying its world famous barbecue was becoming a real possibility. We had planned a full day of of outlet shopping for Tuesday, and while I was willing to forego that for food, Matt was not and as desperate as I was, I wasn’t prepared to break up our marriage over smoked brisket.

I needed to find a place where we could eat as early and as quickly as possible, which effectively meant that we were going to have to eat barbecue for breakfast but I didn’t have a problem with that.

So this was my plan: check out of our hotel and drive to the La Barbecue truck about half an hour before its opening time of 11 am, PRAY that there isn’t a line, and hopefully be finished eating by midday, leaving us plenty of time to go shopping and stick to our schedule for remainder of the day.

I woke up that morning feeling incredibly anxious. I kept on visualising driving up to the truck, seeing a ridiculously long line, and being forced to just turn around and watch my barbecue dreams slowly fade away as we drove off into the distance . . .

Luckily, the barbecue gods decided to give me a fair go that day. We arrived at La Barbecue at 10:30 am and HOORAY there was only a handful of people waiting on the picnic benches.

x31

This is when I started to let myself get excited.

champagne

La Barbecue is owned and run by LeAnn Mueller, who hails from a Texan barbecue dynasty. Her brother John runs John Mueller Meat Co which is a name you’ll find alongside La Barbecue on almost every “Best BBQ” list about Texas. Mueller enlisted the expertise of pitmaster John Lewis (ex-Franklin Barbecue, nicknamed the “badass brisket boy” and now moving on to open his own restaurant in Charleston, South Carolina) and after swinging open its trailer doors in late 2012, La Barbecue very quickly become a top contender in the Austin BBQ stakes.

x30

I didn’t really expect such a famous food hotspot to look so… dingy. I guess all the money goes into the meats and the pitmaster’s salary.

This is the firepit trailer. It fits thirty-two briskets, twenty-four racks of beef ribs, sixteen racks of pork ribs, three whole turkey breasts, and six pork butts. Basically, an entire farm of animal carcasses (sorry vegetarians!)

x33

The menu is written out in marker on big sheet of butcher’s paper confirming that absolutely zero dollars are going into design and decor here. As 11am approached and a line began to form, we studied the menu and realized that our original plan of just walking up to the counter and saying “one of everything, please!” wasn’t going to work out, especially with beef ribs costing $22 + tax per pound, and each rib weighing almost 2 lbs.

x34

In the line there was a mix of people who were clearly tourists (couples like us who were over-excited, stressed about what to order, and taking photos all over the place), and men who were there by themselves or with a mate, with their hands in their pockets just chillin’ like they were in the line at McDonalds. The guys in front of us looked like they were local regulars so we asked them for recommendations on what to order.

x35

They recommended the brisket (duh) and the beef ribs, and also mentioned the sausage was pretty good. Given the cost and size of the beef rib, we decided against it since Matt and I aren’t really big beef-eaters. Matt wanted pork ribs because they’re his fave, and I wanted to try some turkey because I’m a sucker for turkey meat and I’ve never had it barbecued. As we approached the counter, they gave each person a small cube of brisket as a sample. As I bit into it, the explosion of fatty, salty, juicy, smokey flavor made me shout “OMG THIS IS SO GOOD!” so loud that Matt got upset and told me to calm down and stand further away from him.

After a lot of careful thought, this was our final order: 3/4 pound brisket, 1 pound pork ribs (Matt’s choice), 1/4 pound turkey (my choice) and 1 sausage. On the side, chipotle coleslaw and pinto beans. About fifty dollars in total, including tax.

x36

BEHOLD THE GLORY!

I can hear my stomach weep as I look over these photos.

We sat down at a table with, not a plate, not a platter, but a TRAY full of meat and began to eat the greasiest, most carnivorous brunch of our lives.

x37

The pork ribs were spice-rubbed and glazed so shiny you could almost see your face in them. The meat fell off the bone like the it didn’t want anything to do with it, and in my opinion these were the best pork ribs I’ve had in my life. Matt prefers his ribs saucier, but he still polished these off within minutes.

The turkey breast was just okay – grilled as a breast alone it didn’t have the juiciness off turkey meat bathed in butter and roasted whole for hours in the oven. It would be good in a sandwich, but by itself it was just taking up precious stomach space I needed to reserve for brisket.

Did someone say brisket?

x38

OH-OHHH!

These days, any old food photo is hashtag food porn, but the brisket in this picture is so fleshy and sensual that it almost makes me blush. Covered in a crusty black salt and pepper rub that fades into a scarlet smoke ring, there’s a layer of perfectly rendered fat dripping into the butcher’s paper, and the meat falls apart on impact with tray.

Brisket is not a naturally tender cut of meat (it’s a muscle that acts as a cow’s collarbone) so cooking it well is a labour of love and at La Barbecue, it spends twelve to fifteen hours in the pit. If something takes FIFTEEN hours to cook (not including the time it takes to pre-rub and rub) you can be pretty confident that the final product is worth the effort.

Smoked and slow-cooked, the flavour of the meat is as intense as you’d expect. I’ve never had beef that tasted so … beefy. It was like rehydrated black pepper jerky – which doesn’t  make it sound very delicious but if you love beef jerky as much as I do, this is a very good thing. The meat is greasy and the flavour is intense, so eating it with white bread and chipotle slaw (the slaw is really good here btw) helps keep your tastebuds from being too overwhelmed. I’m not quite caveman enough to just eat the meat by itself.

The brisket was so different from anything I’d eaten before, I loved it just for the cultural experience and bragging rights. As much as I wanted it to be the best thing I ate in Texas, that honor still belongs to (don’t judge) my Chick-Fil-A Chicken sandwich. What was even more unexpected, however, was that it wasn’t even the best thing we ate at La Barbecue. It was shockingly upstaged by something we added to our order just because it was cheap and worth a try: the Texas Hot Guts sausage.

x39

The sausage is bright red like a bell pepper and is so fat it looks ready to pop like a pork intestine balloon. Sausage making is a craft of its own, so even the most expert BBQ-ers outsource to professionals. But the sausage at La Barbecue is a John Lewis original. It’s built with a foundation of coarse, greasy beef and is packed with all kinds of secret spices. It is so red, hot, and salty that it was more like a juicy beef chorizo than the BBQ sausages that I’m used to. If we ever find ourselves back at La Barbecue, we won’t be there for the brisket, we’ll be stocking up on the sausages.

x40

So in about thirty minutes, “Omg I think we ordered too much food” turned into an empty tray of grease-soaked butcher’s paper.

We may have eaten this meal with plastic cutlery on a damp wooden picnic table, but the food was world class. Even with my limited experience, I know it’ll be a long time before we eat barbecue this excellent again. I give it four… no, five out of five NBA championship rings.

Five Championships

Now we carry a little piece of Austin with us wherever we go in the pound of weight we each gained from that one meal. “See this new chin I’ve grown? Yeah, I got that all the way from Austin, Texas.”

We knew that San Antonio was way behind Austin in the Texas BBQ rankings, but we still wanted to give it a try. San Antonio BBQ isn’t really famous outside of San Antonio, so I relied on Yelp to help me find a local favorite.

x67

The Big Big (great name) is ranked #1 on Yelp and is located just off the highway. Unlike the cool backyard trailer of La Barbecue, this place had more of a truck driver’s diner vibe.

x60

With Spurs logo painted on the wall and a friendly “You deserve to eat this good” greeting us, we liked this place from the moment we walked in. Here you can buy meats by the pound or as a plate of one or two meats with two sides of your choice.

x61

Even though I wasn’t a HUGE fan of the brisket at La Barbecue, I can’t resist ordering the local speciality when I travel so I got the brisket again, with some pulled pork, collard greens and pinto beans. Collard greens because I saw them on Top Chef and I’ve always wondered what they tasted like. They’re mushy and gross, it turns out. Like someone stewed up some random plants from the yard because they didn’t have any other vegetables to serve with their meat.

You can see from the photo that the brisket here was no where near as glamorous as the one at La Barbecue. It was still tender, but the smoky flavor was milder which I actually quite liked. The pulled pork was just pulled pork and was not really a smart choice on my part. I should have gone for the bbq chicken.

x63

Matt got the pork ribs (of course), which were good but nothing particularly special. I think he enjoyed his sweet potato casserole even more than his meat.

IMG_8647

I got pretty excited about the bottomless styrofoam soda cups which were as big as my face (“This is SO American!”) but people tell me this isn’t actually that big haha.

We finished our plates (with the exception of the icky collard greens) but felt like something was a bit lacking. So, as fatties do, we went back to the counter and ordered some more food. Since we had such a good sausage experience in Austin, we thought we’d try the Jalapeno sausage here too.

x65

Really spicy and tasty, as all sausages are, but I think the hot red sausage at La Barbecue ruined us for life. Nothing will ever come close.

This was all I was meant to get but as I was waiting in line I saw all these framed newspaper clippings raving about the peach cobbler, so I thought I’d just add that to the order for dessert.

x66

It was good but SUPER sweet and we could only handle a few spoonfuls.

If La Barbecue is the hipster, “fine dining” version of Texas Barbecue, The Big Bib is your friendly mom and pop’s. Cheap and cheerful – the whole meal cost us about half of our tray from La Barbecue. I give it a rarely seen, very special Kawhi smile.

Kawhi Smile

And with a heavy heart, I now end the four-part saga that was my trip to Texas; a place I fell in love with so fast and deep I actually wept at San Antonio airport as we waited for our flight back home to Seoul.

manucrying

Texas: Austin, San Antonio, my Spurs, Sixth Street, the River Walk, Tex Mex, Chik-Fil-A, In-N-Out, and Barbecue – you are my new favourite. The hero of all my dreams. The place I would always rather be. I’ll miss you but I promise I’ll be back.

obfok

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: